Depression Quiz | MindSpot Clinic
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Depression Quiz


The Depression Quiz is an easy and anonymous way of finding out about your current level of depression. It takes less than 2 minutes to complete and will provide you with feedback about the severity of your depression symptoms as well as some tips which may help. Your results may also indicate whether you might benefit from treatment and help you to decide whether completing a screening assessment for one of the MindSpot online Courses might be worth considering.

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems?
Depression quiz

Quiz Progress

1 - Little interest or pleasure in doing things

2 - Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless

3 - Trouble falling or staying asleep, or sleeping too much

4 - Feeling tired or having little energy

5 - Poor appetite or overeating

6 - Feeling bad about yourself, or that you are a failure or have let yourself or your family down

7 - Trouble concentrating on things, such as reading the newspaper or watching television

8 - Moving or speaking so slowly that other people could have noticed? Or the opposite, being so fidgety or restless that you have been moving around a lot more than usual.

9 - Thoughts that you would be better off dead or of hurting yourself in some way

You do not have any symptoms of depression

Based on your answers to the quiz, you have no clinically significant symptoms of low mood or depression. This means that if you are going through a challenging time in your life, you are handling it very well.

It is important that we continue to look after ourselves at all times. The following things help us maintain our physical and mental wellbeing:

  1. Regularly doing things we enjoy and that are good for us, such as hobbies
  2. Staying in contact with good family and friends
  3. A healthy and balanced diet
  4. Regular exercise
  5. The right amount of sleep. We need about 6 to 8 hours of sleep every night to function at our best.

If you ever feel overwhelmed with symptoms of low mood, anxiety or depression, remember that there is plenty of help and support available for you.

In these instances, consider talking to a trusted friend or health professional. You are also welcome to return to the MindSpot Clinic for further tips and support.

You have mild symptoms of low mood or depression

There are many reasons why people experience low mood or mild symptoms of depression. These may include:

  • going through a difficult time or a change in life that is naturally hard to adjust to, like a loss
  • dealing with illness or health difficulties
  • experiencing relationship problems, financial problems or other challenges.

Symptoms of low mood should be a trigger for us to do something helpful or change something in our life. You can take active steps to stop yourself from feeling worse and lift your mood. Try the following to help improve your mood:

  1. Do one thing each day that you enjoy. This may be a social activity such as a coffee with a friend, or a hobby such as gardening, reading or going for a walk. We function best when we have things to look forward to.
  2. Talk to family or friends to get sensible advice about how they cope with low mood. Good family and friends can support you during challenging times and can share experiences that might help.
  3. Keep your thoughts and expectations realistic. Our view of the world and particularly of ourselves can become negative and critical when we are feeling down – this can make us feel even worse. Try to treat yourself the way you would treat a good friend.
  4. Stay as physically healthy and active as you can. A healthy and balanced diet, and regular exercise is essential for our physical and mental wellbeing.
  5. Get the right amount of sleep. We need about 6 to 8 hours of sleep every night to function at our best. Not getting enough sleep can have many negative effects on our health. Oversleeping often can also be unhealthy for us.

Take-away message

  • Low mood is a normal human emotion and it is normal for all of us to experience low mood when we go through major changes, challenges or disappointments.
  • There are many simple things we can do to lift our mood. (Download 10 Things That Help for helpful tips on managing symptoms).
  • Symptoms of low mood or mild depression often resolve within 2 weeks. If your symptoms last for more than 2 weeks or get worse, consider talking to a trusted friend or a health professional.

You have moderate symptoms of depression

We know that people with moderate symptoms of depression are having a difficult time. We hope you are doing okay. If you are feeling unsafe or suicidal, please visit the I need urgent help page.

Moderate symptoms of depression often occur when we are dealing with a difficult situation. If you are dealing with a difficult situation, it is normal to experience such symptoms for short periods of time. During this time, you can take active steps to stop yourself from feeling worse and lift your mood. Try the following to help improve your symptoms:

  1. Talk to family or friends to get sensible advice about how they cope with low mood. Good family and friends can support you during challenging times and can share experiences that might help.
  2. Stay in regular contact with good people. Staying engaged with our support network helps us avoid becoming isolated and feeling lonely.
  3. Avoid alcohol and drugs. These may seem helpful in the short term, but often cause other problems.
  4. Do things that you enjoy and that are good for you each day. This may be a social activity such as a coffee with a friend, or a hobby such as gardening, reading or going for a walk. This helps with mood, perspective, and keeps up healthy habits. We function best when we have things to look forward to.
  5. Keep your thoughts and expectations realistic. Our view of the world and particularly of ourselves can become negative and critical when we are feeling down – this can make us feel even worse. Try to treat yourself the way you would treat a good friend.
  6. Stay as physically healthy and active as you can. A healthy and balanced diet, and regular exercise is essential for our physical and mental wellbeing.
  7. Get the right amount of sleep. We need about 6 to 8 hours of sleep every night to function at our best. Not getting enough sleep can have many negative effects on our health. Oversleeping often can also be unhealthy for us.

When symptoms continue for more than two weeks, people are at risk of developing depression. The good news is that there is plenty of help available and people can and do recover. If your symptoms haven’t resolved within two weeks or are getting worse, we strongly recommend the following:

  1. Get an assessment by a health professional (a GP, psychologist or psychiatrist) and ask about your treatment options. You are also welcome to do our free online screening assessment to help learn more about your symptoms and things that can help.
  2. Start treatment as soon as possible. There are many treatments that are proven to work for depression, including psychological therapies and antidepressant medication.

Take-away message

  • Moderate symptoms of depression are normal for short periods of time when we are dealing with difficult situations.
  • There are many simple things we can do to improve these symptoms. (Download 10 Things That Help for helpful tips on managing symptoms).
  • If your symptoms last for more than 2 weeks, or get worse, we strongly recommend seeking help from a health professional and starting treatment as soon as you can.

You have moderately severe symptoms of depression

We know that people with moderately severe symptoms of depression are having a difficult time. We hope you are doing okay. If you are feeling unsafe or suicidal, please visit the I need urgent help page.

Moderately severe symptoms of depression often occur when we are dealing with a difficult situation or a traumatic event. If you are dealing with a difficult situation, it is normal to experience such symptoms for short periods of time. In these cases, symptoms often naturally resolve with time. However, people with moderately severe symptoms are at high risk of having depression and some may need professional support.

We strongly recommend that you:

  1. Seek assessment and treatment from a health professional (like a GP, a psychologist or a psychiatrist) as soon as you can. You are also welcome to do our free online screening assessment to learn more about your symptoms.
  2. Start treatment as soon as possible. There are many treatments that are proven to work for depression, including psychological therapies and antidepressant medication.

Alongside seeking professional support, other things that can help people with moderately severe symptoms of depression include:

  1. Talk to family or friends to get sensible advice about how they cope with low mood. Good family and friends can support you during challenging times and can share experiences that might help.
  2. Stay in regular contact with good people. Staying engaged with our support network helps us avoid becoming isolated and feeling lonely.
  3. Avoid alcohol and drugs. These may seem helpful in the short term, but often cause other problems.
  4. Do things that you enjoy and that are good for you each day. This may be a social activity such as a coffee with a friend or a hobby such as gardening, reading or going for a walk. This helps with mood, perspective, and keeps up healthy habits. We function best when we have things to look forward to.
  5. Keep your thoughts and expectations realistic. Our view of the world and particularly of ourselves can become negative and critical when we are feeling down – this can make us feel even worse. Try to treat yourself the way you would treat a good friend.
  6. Stay as physically healthy and active as you can. A healthy and balanced diet, and regular exercise is essential for our physical and mental wellbeing.
  7. Get the right amount of sleep. We need about 6 to 8 hours of sleep every night to function at our best. Not getting enough sleep can have many negative effects on our health. Oversleeping often can also be unhealthy for us.

Take-away message

  • Moderately severe symptoms of depression can sometimes occur when people go through difficult or traumatic life events.
  • Professional support can help people recover from depression. We strongly recommend you seek help from a health professional and start treatment as soon as you can.
  • Alongside professional support, there are many simple things we can do ourselves to improve symptoms of depression. (Download 10 Things That Help for helpful tips on managing symptoms).

You have severe symptoms of depression

We know that people with severe symptoms of depression are having a very difficult time, and often have depression. We hope you are doing okay. If you are feeling suicidal or unsafe, please visit the I need urgent help page.

Severe symptoms of depression can occur because of stressful events, like a loss, or a traumatic event. In these cases, symptoms often naturally resolve with time. However, some people with severe symptoms need professional support.

The good news is that people can and do recover from depression. We strongly recommend that you:

  1. Seek assessment and treatment from a health professional (like a GP, a psychologist or a psychiatrist) today. You are also welcome to do our free online screening assessment to learn more about your symptoms.
  2. Start treatment as soon as possible. There are many treatments that are proven to work for depression, including psychological therapies and antidepressant medication.

Alongside seeking professional support, other things that can help people with severe symptoms of depression include:

  1. Talk to family or friends to get sensible advice about how they cope with low mood. Good family and friends can support you during challenging times and can share experiences that might help.
  2. Stay in regular contact with good people. Staying engaged with our support network helps us avoid becoming isolated and feeling lonely.
  3. Avoid alcohol and drugs. These may seem helpful in the short term, but often cause other problems.
  4. Do things that you enjoy and that are good for you each day. This may be a social activity such as a coffee with a friend or a hobby such as gardening, reading or going for a walk. This helps with mood, perspective, and keeps up healthy habits. We function best when we have things to look forward to.
  5. Keep your thoughts and expectations realistic. Our view of the world and particularly of ourselves can become negative and critical when we are feeling down – this can make us feel even worse. Try to treat yourself the way you would treat a good friend.
  6. Stay as physically healthy and active as you can. A healthy and balanced diet, and regular exercise is essential for our physical and mental wellbeing.
  7. Get the right amount of sleep. We need about 6 to 8 hours of sleep every night to function at our best. Not getting enough sleep can have many negative effects on our health. Oversleeping often can also be unhealthy for us.

Take-away message

  • Severe symptoms of depression can sometimes occur when people go through traumatic life events.
  • Professional support can help people recover from depression. We strongly recommend you seek help from a health professional and start treatment as soon as you can.
  • Alongside professional support, there are many simple things we can do ourselves to improve symptoms of depression. (Download 10 Things That Help for helpful tips on managing symptoms).
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